Monthly Archives: October 2018

The 4 Best Thanksgiving Movies & T.V. Episodes

Here is our list of the 4 Best Movies & T.V. Episodes with Thanksgiving Themes.

Planes Train and Automobiles. This 1987 movie starring Steve Martin and John Candy continues to hold up as one of the funniest and most moving Thanksgiving films ever made. Steve Martin is Neal Page, a Chicago executive willing to do anything to get back home to Chicago in time for his family Thanksgiving. That is, Neal is willing to do anything except actually be nice to the people around him and notice that he is not the only person in America trying to get home. His nasty attitude makes him his own worst enemy and constantly sabotages his chances of getting home for Thanksgiving. Neal is helped by the happy, optimistic and somewhat crazy salesman Del Griffith, perfectly played by John Candy.

Steve Martin & John Candy in "Planes Trains and Automobiles"

Steve Martin & John Candy in “Planes Trains and Automobiles”

Del makes friends wherever he goes, and never gets angry or lashes out when things go wrong. One the other hand, Neil is so self-centered that he never once stops to wonder why Del is spending so much effort to help a stranger make it home. When Del’s secret is finally revealed it still brings tears to our eyes. John Candy’s performance in this scene is incredibly moving.

Unfortunately, John Candy died in 1994 at the age of 43. His performance in Planes Trains and Automobiles demonstrates that he had the talent to become a truly great dramatic actor. The word lost this talented Canadian far too soon.

Frank Bonner and Gordon Jump in "WKRP in Cincinnati" "As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly"

Frank Bonner and Gordon Jump in “WKRP in Cincinnati” “As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly”

WKRP in Cincinnati Turkey Bombs Episode 1978, has been replayed on T.V. every Thanksgiving for the past 39 years, but is still funny. It is hard to believe there is anyone in America who has not seen it. The WKRP sales manager Herb Tarlek (Frank Bonner) and station owner Mr. Carlson (Gordon Jump) hatch a plot to give a Thanksgiving surprise to the people of Cincinnati. What they don’t tell anyone is that the surprise consists of the release of live turkeys from a blimp over a crowd of unsuspecting Cincinnati citizens. While wild turkeys are beautiful in flight, domestic farm turkeys are too fat to ever get off the ground. Herb and Mr. Carlson release 100 farm turkeys from the blimp expecting them to soar though the sky. Instead they plummet to the ground like 20 pound bombs, smashing windshields, and causing the waiting crowd to run for cover.

Richard Sanders in "WKRP in Cincinnati"

Richard Sanders in “WKRP in Cincinnati”

The funniest part of the episode is Les Nessman (Richard Sanders) reporting the event on the radio exactly like it is the 1937 Hindenburg disaster in Lakehurst New Jersey. Richard Sanders does a perfect impression of radio reporter Herbert Morrison, who broke down on air while reporting the Hindenburg crash.

BEWITCHED - "Samantha's Thanksgiving to Remember" - Airdate: November 23, 1967. (Photo by ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images)ELIZABETH MONTGOMERY;DICK YORK

BEWITCHED – “Samantha’s Thanksgiving to Remember” – Airdate: November 23, 1967. (Photo by ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty Images)ELIZABETH MONTGOMERY;DICK YORK

Bewitched – Samantha’s Thanksgiving to Remember (1967), where the entire family is transported back to the original Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving through a magic spell. Darin (Dick York) is so worried that the Pilgrims will figure out that Samantha (Elizabeth Montgomery) is a witch that he fails to pay attention his own behavior. Darin’s use of modern language and slang quickly gets him branded as a witch. Bewitched was a silly, fun show with an ensemble cast of actors that truly enjoyed with each other. Dick York eventually had to leave the show; unable to work due to severe back problems. Actors in those days did not get paid the enormous sums they make today, and Dick York had real financial problems later in life. Despite his health and financial problems he never complained, and spent huge amount of time working tirelessly to help the homeless.

Rocky – Most people do not think of Rocky as a Thanksgiving movie, but Rocky is a film that shows the dark side of Thanksgiving. Rocky is not really a boxing film. Rocky  is a movie about lonely people trying desperately to prove  that they actually matter in the world. When Paulie (Burt Young) ruins Thanksgiving dinner, Adrian (Talia Shire) tells Rocky (Sylvester Stallone) how upset that made her. Rocky, responds, “to you its Thanksgiving. To me its Thursday.”

To many people Thanksgiving is the worst day of the year. People who are alone and desperate see television and movies over and over emphasize that everyone else in America is spending the day with loving friends and family. No wonder that Thanksgiving has one of the highest suicide rates of the year.

Talia Shire and Sylvester Stallone in Rocky

Talia Shire and Sylvester Stallone in Rocky

Rocky is not about winning a boxing match. Rocky is about Rocky, Adrian, and Micky (Burgess Meredith) all winning their self respect. Paulie never does quite get his self respect, but he does have Adrian and Rocky continue to  stand by him, despite his faults.

You may notice that we don’t have any new shows on this list. Perhaps it is just nostalgia, but we really fell that these old shows captured the true spirit of the holiday.

We at East Coast Stories wish our readers a happy Thanksgiving. If like , Rocky you find that the day is not Thanksgiving but just another Thursday, don’t despair. There are thousands of people who feel just like you. Things will get better.

“The Dutch bring their own water” – Why the Dutch are the most hated tourists in Europe

“The Dutch even bring their own water” is an expression Europeans use to complain about the Dutch tendency to  vacation in  other countries and yet never spend a penny. The Dutch often travel outside The Netherlands in campers and carry all their own food and water with them. This means that when they get to another country they don’t have to spend any money. Nothing  for hotels or food. They don’t even buy a bottle of water. In fact, other Europeans wonder why the Dutch even bother to travel outside The Netherlands in the first place.

Dutch campers make the Dutch the most hated tourists in Europe

Dutch campers make the Dutch the most hated tourists in Europe

The expression The Dutch even bring their own wateris, of course, an exaggeration by frustrated European shopkeepers and hoteliers However, it does reflect a real frustration with Dutch “tourists”.

In a survey of what nationalities tip, the Dutch don't even make the list.

In a survey of what nationalities tip, the Dutch don’t even make the list.

Americans, on the other hand, are loved in Europe.  This comes as a surprise to most Americans, who have heard so many tales of rude French and Italians. It all boils down to money – Americans spend it and the Dutch don’t.

Americans tip big in Europe. American's don't consider Euro coins "real" money.

Americans tip big in Europe. American’s don’t consider Euro coins “real” money.

American tourists can’t speak the languages, don’t understand the culture or the cuisine, but they make up for all that with the habit of spending big. Plus Americans, do something most Europeans either skimp on  or skip completely – Americans Tip. In fact, the advent of the Euro hugely increased the amount Americans leave for tips. Euro coins don’t seem like real money to Americans ,so they give them away like they are worthless. It is not at all unusual to see an American give a handful of Euro coins to an amazed and happy European waiter as a tip.

Copper wire was created by 2 Dutchmen fighting over a penny

Copper wire was created by 2 Dutchmen fighting over a penny

The Dutch, on the other hand, are not at all insulted by their reputation for being cheap. In fact it is a  source of national pride. A popular joke in The Netherlands is,

  • “How was copper wire invented?”
  • The answer is “Two Dutchmen fighting over a penny”

That joke is hundreds of years old and the Dutch tell it proudly. The Dutch have always been careful with money. It is one of the things that allowed them to survive and thrive, despite being a tiny country with a small population.

The Iron Bank on "Game of Thrones" is supposed to represent the bankers of The Netherlands

The Iron Bank on “Game of Thrones” is supposed to represent the bankers of The Netherlands

In 1776 the  French King gave money to the American Patriots during the American Revolution. In contrast, the Dutch government had no interest in giving any money to the Americans. However, the Dutch bankers loaned large amounts of money at 5% interest to the Americans. In fact, the Dutch were loaning money to the British at the same time. The Dutch are such good bankers that they were able to successfully get full repayment on both these sets of loans.  On the T.V. series Game of Thrones, Braavos represents The Netherlands. Braavos is clever enough to stay out of all the wars, yet make money by loaning gold to all sides.

So if you are ever  in Europe and you hear someone say “The Dutch even bring their own water”, don’t feel badly for the Dutch. Other Europeans may mean it as an insult, but the Dutch take it as a compliment.

Drinking Buddies -Can a man really be “Just Friends” with a beautiful woman?

Drinking Buddies is a clever independent film about 4 people who each seem to be with the wrong partners. The plot revolves around people work at a small craft brewery. It is nice for a change to have a film where the characters are not cops, doctors or lawyers. They are real people with real issues, that need to be solved without car chases, gunfights or dramatic court scenes.

Olivia Wilde & Jake Johnson in "Drinking Buddies"

Olivia Wilde & Jake Johnson in “Drinking Buddies”

Kate (Olivia Wilde) works at Revolution Brewing with her best friend Luke (Jake Johnson). There is no romantic connection, but they love playing practical jokes on each other and telling silly jokes at lunchtime. Every night Kate and Luke go out with the rest of the workers for drinks and food. In fact, Revolution Brewing seems like the kind of place we would all love to work.

Anna Kendrick & Ron Livingston in "Drinking Buddies"

Anna Kendrick & Ron Livingston in “Drinking Buddies”

Kate and Luke both have full time partners. Luke lives with Jill (Anna Kendrick), who is a Special Education teacher with a masters degree.  She is very different than Kate. Jill is shy and introverted, whereas Kate is outgoing to the extreme. Jill never really gets cray while Kate  loves beer perhaps a little too much.

Olivia Wilde & Ron Livingston in "Drinking Buddies"

Olivia Wilde & Ron Livingston in “Drinking Buddies”

Kate’s boyfriend is Chris (Ron Livingston), an intellectual who loves books, nature and hiking. He invites Jill and Luke to spend a weekend with he and Kate at his beautiful cabin in the woods. Don’t worry, Drinking Buddies does not suddenly turn into a horror movie. No killer in a Halloween mask suddenly comes out of the lake. However,it does become obvious that the matching of the couples seems wrong. Jill and Chris want to spend the time hiking and enjoying nature while Kate and Luke are happy to spend all their time drinking beer, staying indoors playing board games and telling stupid jokes.

A badly written movie would have them all simply switch partners at the cabin, but real life is more complicated than that.  Drinking Buddies takes a realistic approach. The weekend ends with relationships supposedly unchanged. However, you can tell that the encounter has altered forever the way they all think about each other.

Could a man really be "just friends" with Olivia Wilde?

Could a man really be “just friends” with Olivia Wilde?

We will not spoil the plot by going any further, other than to say that the ending is beautiful and satisfying.

Some people might find Drinking Buddies too slow-moving. There never is a real action scene. If you are expecting a Hollywood blockbuster type of plot then Drinking Buddies is not for you. However, if you love independent films where the characters are real, then we hope you enjoy Drinking Buddies as much as we did.

Bunny enjoying an October Salad

Five and one half year old Sunshine enjoys a huge salad on a warm October afternoon.

Five year old Sunshine enjoying his salad on a warm October afternoon

Five year old Sunshine enjoying his salad on a warm October afternoon

A  4 pound domestic mixed-breed, he eats many times his weight each week. He came to our home 4 years ago as a rescue rabbit.  Someone had tossed him out the window of a car, but a passerby took him to Safe Haven Rabbit Rescue.

Sunshine seems to have gotten over the traumatic events of his past.

Advice and Consent – A film about a Senate confirmation hearing with Sex, Blackmail and Perjury

Advice and Consent is the 1962 movie about a Senate confirmation hearing where sex, blackmail, and perjury become more important than the technical qualifications of the nominee. Henry Fonda stars as Robert Leffingwell, who has been nominated by the President (Franchot Tone) to be the Secretary of State. He is a controversial pick, and his nomination sets off a no-holds barred fight with both pro and con forces using every dirty trick possible.

Henry Fonda facing a Senate inquiry in Advice and Consent

Henry Fonda facing a Senate inquiry in Advice and Consent

At the time Advice and Consent was released, audiences thought it was an exciting but ridiculously “over the top” piece of fiction. In 1962, the American public still believed in the dignity and decency of its public officials. Of course, that was decades before the confirmation hearings of Clarence Thomas and Brett Kavanaugh.

Former Vice President Richard Nixon was offered the role of Vice President  in Advice and Consent, but turned it down. Richard Nixon said Advice and Consent  contained too many obvious errors about how the government actually functions.

However, Advise and Consent does have former Arizona Senator Henry F. Ashurst, who had served 30 years in the Senate. He was 87 years old when Advice and Consent was filmed. Ashurst plays an old Senator who sleeps through most of the proceedings, but who vehemently shouts “Opposed!” whenever something disturbs his slumber.

Advice and Consent shocked 1962 audiences by broaching the subject of homosexuality, and for the first time on the silver screen showing a gay bar. In Advice and Consent, one of the married Senators had a homosexual affair in college, and he is being blackmailed to pressure him to vote in the proper direction.

Charles Laughton & Walter Pidgeon in the 1962 film Advice and Consent

Charles Laughton & Walter Pidgeon in the 1962 film Advice and Consent

The casting in Advice and Consent was a deliberate snub at the McCarthy-era investigations. Many of the actors cast in Advice and Consent had been directly impacted by the Hollywood “black list”. It was also risky to cast Charles Laughton in a film that mentioned homosexuality. Charles Laughton was one of the few actors who were openly gay in 1962.

The 1962 film Advice and Consent was considered exciting fiction that could never actually happen.

The 1962 film Advice and Consent was considered exciting fiction that could never actually happen.

There have been few films that had such an all star cast as Advice and Consent. In addition to Henry Fonda, Advice and Consent features Charles Laughton, Walter Pidgeon, Peter Lawford and Betty White. A part was even offered to Martin Luther King Jr. He was to play an Ambassador, even though in 1962 The United States did not actually have any African-American Ambassadors. However, Martin Luther King Jr. felt that appearing in Advice and Consent would take focus away fro his civil rights work.

Clarence Thomas & Brett Kavanaugh

Clarence Thomas & Brett Kavanaugh

Advice and Consent is an excellent film and is fascinating to watch from today’s perspective. One interesting point is that in Advice and Consent, all the really dirty tactics, accusations and  attacks take place out of view of the American public. Unlike today’s televised hearings, in Advice and Consent, the Senators were able to keep the really unsavory working of the government hidden from the general population. Perhaps this was better. As Prince Otto von Bismarck once said, “no one really wants to know how the sausage is made.”